The Show Tell Project

For Seymour's Fat Lady

Lesser Known Artists: Lucille Malkia Roberts

by fyarlgiles

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Malkia Roberts ( 1923 ), “Spectrum” Acrylic on canvas 1972

This image, according to the artist, represents acceptance of the present and anticipation of the future. The woman is the past, and the Expressionistic style and upward gaze symbolize the future. The flame-like palette “eliminates the possibility of negative space and ensuing objectivity” (203).

guardian

Malkia Roberts ( 1923 ), “Guardian” Oil and Acrylic on canvas 1986

Human figures are often found in Roberts’ art, but abstracted. The theme of this piece is “women of color” and how they are “protectors of family and tradition.” She is quoted as saying, “My ‘gathered visions’ are evoked and implied rather than realistically delineated in the traditional sense. They have evolved and are wedded in patterns of light and color, reflecting my emotional and spiritual reactions to places and ‘people of color’ around the planet, with whom I have bonded. The energy invites viewers to unravel the themes and come to their own conclusions.”

Information from University of Iowa

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Gone

by fyarlgiles

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HIs white walk

hardens in that place between my spine

and my skull–

It feels like holding back tears

and scattered fever chills–

like scraping rusty metal with my splitting fingernail

until the sound numbs my arm

and I cannot speak.

But it is the

last new memory I have

of him.

And

I

will not bury it

today.

“Gone” by Angie Hoover-Hillhouse 

Artwork: Our Great Love Story by Agnes Cecille

Disco Planet

by fyarlgiles

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She’s a disco

lollipop

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with

golden gloves

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that shimmer

and shine

like her

diamond

blood

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she’s a million

pouty,

lipstuck

mouths

spitting

kisses

at the crowd

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A  vulgar splat

of

invincible youth

hissing at boredom–

so sure of the

truth.

“Cocaine Kisses” by Angie Hoover-Hillhouse

Artwork by MIchelle Cordes